An exhibition curated by Lyle Rexer.

 

 

 

From April 20 through May 20, 2006

 

See Pictures

 

Haim Chanin Fine Arts proudly presents Drawing on the Wrong Side of the Brain, a group exhibition curated by art critic and writer Lyle Rexer, on view from April 20 through May 20, 2006. The exhibition includes works on paper, installations, artist’s books and photographs by Joaquim Chancho, Vicky Colombet, Pierluigi Consagra, Pietro Consagra, Henri Dimier, Dan Estabrook, Agustin Fernandez, Leon Ferrari, Joanne Greenbaum, Michelle Segre, Molly Smith, Gerry Snyder, Harald Stoffers, Harvey Tulcensky, and Zush/Evru.

 

For Lyle Rexer, “drawing is the somatic art, the art mediated by the body, where hand and eye unite in a feedback loop and the gesture becomes the royal road to the unconscious.  Paul Klee called it ‘a random line on a walk,’ to emphasize the physical and unpremeditated essence of drawing. Today the notion of the so-called right brain as the source of spontaneous visual creativity has fueled a teaching approach that such artists as Rodin, the Fauvists, and the Expressionists of Die Brücke would have embraced. But the independence of drawing now, its liberation from any ancillary role, even that of

opening Psyche’s door, reveals a different reality, more complex, exciting, and strange.

 

“In these drawings, gesture may be the last and least important of the elements.  Here right brain and left brain are in constant dialogue.  Here conception, inner vision, and abstract formalizing collide.  Here language and communicative intent motivate gesture.  Here the feedback loop connects hand, eye, and brain, as artists imagine other worlds and respond to the forms taking shape under their hand.  In their work, even the notion of the ‘unconscious’ is transformed, from the spontaneous upwelling of buried desires to a place to play, a partially excavated hieroglyphic, a foundry of forms, a fire around which we tell the most outrageous stories.”

 

Joaquim Chancho (b. 1943) - A leading painter of Catalunya, Joaquim uses abstract pattern drawings to investigate the relation between image and support, paper surface and pen impression. Vicky Colombet (b. 1953) - French artist Vicky Colombet’s diptychs pair radically different techniques of ground pigment and line drawing to produce a double vision of landscape. Pierluigi Consagra (b. 1953) - Italian-born Pierluigi Consagra produces large-scale fantasy drawings that combine images from his subconscious with references to the history of art. Pietro Consagra (1920-2005) - Among Italy’s foremost artists, the late Pietro Consagra used drawing as the conceptual foundation for his sculptures. Henri Dimier (1899-1986) - Noted French painter and legendary teacher Henri Dimier uses drawing as a form of experiment in the minimal distribution of forms.

 

Dan Estabrook (b. 1969) - Brooklyn artist Dan Estabrook harks back to the earliest methods of photography to explore the boundary between making and taking a picture. Agustin Fernandez (b.1928) - One of Cuba’s most important expatriate artists, Agustin Fernandez combines Minimalism and the sexual preoccupations of Surrealism. Leon Ferrari (b. 1920) - A founder of Argentine conceptual art, Leon Ferrari inaugurated language-based drawing in the early 1960s and continues to explore the form. Joanne Greenbaum (b. 1953) - Joanne Greenbaum’s “The Pile” hangs on the wall of her New York studio, an expanding notebook from which she harvests ideas for paintings and drawings. Michelle Segre (b. 1965) - As New Yorker Michelle Segre draws, never knowing where her hand will lead her, visual stories take shape.

 

Molly Smith (b. 1976) - Molly Smith’s ink drawings combine fluid gesture and precise premeditation, spontaneous poetry and calculated effect. Gerry Snyder (b. 1953) - Well known for his quirky allegorical painting, Santa Fe artist Gerry Snyder works over a photograph to create an homage to and send up of curator Rob Storr. Harald Stoffers (b. 1969) - German “outsider” Harald Stoffers composes, arranges and visually embellishes letters to his beloved mother, creating one almost every day. Harvey Tulcensky (b. 1948) - New York artist Harvey Tulcensky creates accordion drawings that function as a psychic and visual notepad.

 

Zush/Evru (b. 1946) - Before the Spanish artist Zush assumed his new identity as Evru, he did a series of drawings of imagined beings that heralded his transformation. Lyle Rexer was educated at the University of Michigan, Columbia University, and Merton College, Oxford University, which he attended as a Rhodes Scholar. He holds B.A. and M.A. degrees from Columbia University.  He is the author of several books, including How to Look at Outsider Art (2005); Photography’s Antiquarian Avant-Garde: The New Wave in Old Processes (2002); and Jonathan Lerman: The Drawings of an Artist with Autism (2002). In addition to his book projects, Lyle Rexer has published many catalogue essays dealing with contemporary artists and collections and contributes articles on art, architecture, photography and culture to a variety of publications, including The New York Times, Art in America, Art on Paper, Aperture, Graphis, Metropolis, and Raw Vision.  

      

For more information or images related to this exhibition please contact Mathilde Simian, at 646 230 7200 or msimian@haimchanin.com. To download the press release, click here.

 

 

 

 

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